Appalachian Family Folk Gathering

The 43rd annual Gathering will take place June 8-11, 2020. 

Hindman Settlement School’s Appalachian Family Folk Gathering provides an opportunity for members of our community and guests from all around the world to share in a week of traditional Appalachian music, dance, crafts, storytelling, instrument playing, and special children’s activities. Our goal is to promote awareness of the region’s rich cultural heritage and to pass along these treasured, traditional skills to younger generations.

Registration & Fees

Registration & Fees

Registration Fee: $500 per adult, $250 per child
Includes all workshops, concerts, and dances; three nights lodging; and all meals beginning with lunch on Monday through lunch on Thursday (except for dinner on Tuesday which is on-your-own at the Market).

The Settlement offers dormitory and cottage-style housing. Two, and occasionally more, people will share a room. All meals are on campus at the Settlement. Our kitchen accommodates vegetarian diets. For more information on accommodations, click the “About Campus” tab.

Discounts are available for students age 10 to 18 who live in eastern Kentucky. Please email Sam Gleaves at sam@hindman.org for information. Housing is available (at additional cost) for those who wish to stay at the Settlement School during Appalshop’s Seedtime on the Cumberland festival, June 5-6, 2020.

Click here to register today!

Tentative Schedule

Tentative Schedule

Monday, June 8
10:00am Registration/Check-In Gathering Place
11:00am Optional Tours for Early Arrivers
Tour of Troublesome Creek Stringed Instruments
Tour of Forks of Troublesome Farm
Various Locations
12:00pm Lunch & Communal Dishwashing Mullins Center-Dining Hall
1:30pm Concurrent Sessions
Hands In The Kitchen (Dinner Prep)
Knott Co. Neighbors Community Activity
Fiddle: Beginning & Intermediate/Advanced
Banjo: Beg. Clawhammer & East KY Styles
Dulcimer: Beginning & Ritchie Family Style
Guitar: Beginning & Intermediate/Advanced
Mandolin: All Levels
Bass: All Levels
Children: Get To Know You Activities
Various Locations
3:00pm Concurrent Sessions
Writing
Quilting
Woodcarving
Basketweaving
Traditional Music Song Circle
Children: Fiber Arts with Cari Norris   
Various Locations
5:30pm Supper & Communal Dishwashing Mullins Center-Dining Hall
7:00pm Welcome & Introductions Mullins Center-Great Hall
8:30pm Folk Dance Mullins Center-Great Hall
Tuesday, June 9 & Wednesday, June 10
7:15am Coffee Available Mullins Center- Dining Hall
7:30am Ron-Chi (tai-chi) with Ron Pen McLain Chapel
8:00am Breakfast Mullins Center-Dining Hall
9:30am Morning Sing with the Ritchies Mullins Center- Great Hall
10:30am Concurrent Sessions
Appalachian Foodways
Knott Co. Neighbors Community Activity

Fiddle: Beginning & Intermediate/Advanced
Banjo: Beg. Clawhammer & East KY Styles
Dulcimer: Beginning & Ritchie Family Style
Guitar: Beginning & Intermediate/Advanced
Mandolin: All Levels
Bass: All Levels
Children: Instrument Petting Zoo & Games
Various Locations
12:00pm Lunch & Communal Dishwashing Mullins Center-Dining Hall
1:30pm Concurrent Sessions
Writing
Quilting
Woodcarving
Basketweaving
Fiddle: Beginning & Intermediate/Advanced
Banjo: Beg. Clawhammer & East KY Styles
Dulcimer: Beginning & Ritchie Family Style
Guitar: Beginning & Intermediate/Advanced
Mandolin: All Levels
Bass: All Levels
Children: Games & Play
Various Locations
3:00pm Concurrent Sessions
Quilting
Basketweaving
Woodcarving
Shape Note Singing
Children: Music & Games
Various Locations
4:15pm Tuesday only:
Tuesdays on Troublesome
Farmer’s market, traditional music and song from Folk Gathering musicians, and dinner (on-your-own) from vendors

Wednesday only:
Traditional Music Song Circle & Slow Jam

Various Locations
5:30pm Supper & Communal Dishwashing Mullins Center-Dining Hall
7:30pm Evening Concert (Tuesday)
Open Mic (Wednesday)
Mullins Center-Great Hall
8:30pm Square Dance Mullins Center- Great Hall
Thursday, June 11
7:15am Coffee Available Mullins Center- Dining Hall
7:30am Ron-Chi (tai-chi) with Ron Pen McLain Chapel
8:00am Breakfast & Communal Dishwashing Mullins Center- Dining Hall
9:30am Morning Sing with the Ritchies Mullins Center- Great Hall
10:30am Town Hall Discussion
Children’s Games on Hillside
Various Locations
12:00pm Lunch & Communal Dishwashing Mullins Center- Dining Hall
1:00pm Check-Out (unless staying for Seedtime)

Housing is available for an additional costs for participants wishing to take part in Seedtime on the Cumberland.

Sessions

Sessions

Appalachian Foodways: Cornbread Circle (Jason Brashear)
We will share stories about cornbread and special family recipes, then step in the kitchen and make pones of cornbread together.

Banjo, Beginning Clawhammer (Larah Helayne)
In beginning old-time banjo, we will learn the basic clawhammer strum pattern and work on simple, traditional square dance tunes and jam tunes.

Banjo, East Kentucky Styles (Randy Wilson)
Randy will demonstrate some of the old time banjo picking styles and techniques from eastern Kentucky, such as overhand, knocking, and two-finger style picking. Unique banjo tunings from the region will also be used. By learning new songs and tunes, the special East Kentucky banjo techniques will be explained step-by-step.

Bass (Larry Germain)
This bass class will focus on the rhythms and scales used in the most popular and accessible songs which will likely be encountered at a typical jam or song circle.

Basket Weaving (Frances Whitaker)
In this class we will learn the fundamental art and craft of weaving pliable thin strips of wood to create a useful and decorative basket. Various shapes, patterns, handles, and ornaments are possible from simple utilitarian baskets to more complex egg baskets and pitchers.

Children’s Activities (Cari Norris, Tommy Bledsoe, Joy D’Elia, Patty Kannapel, Randy Wilson, Sophie Dansereau, Sam Gleaves)
Activities for children will include a combination of hand crafts, learning about nature, and traditional Appalachian songs/dance, all led by an experienced group of teaching artists. In the “Children’s Games and Play” session, we will explore the rich history of Appalachian home-grown child-rearing strategies, including many games and play activities that teach critical thinking, teamwork, cognitive/memory skills and creativity. Activities will include songs, word-play, movement, improvisation, foolishness and just plain fun. No technology will be used in these activities. The “Children’s Instrument Petting Zoo” session is an action-packed, fun hour of musical exploration!  Kids will learn about a variety of instruments associated with folk music and make their own sounds with the Appalachian dulcimer, five-string banjo, acoustic guitar, fiddle, mandolin, autoharp, tin whistle, and even more instruments.

Dulcimer, Beginning (Cari Norris)
In the beginning dulcimer class we will learn a couple basic tunings, and will touch on both noting and strumming technique as we learn a simple mountain tune or two. I will do my best to meet all students where they are.

Dulcimer, Ritchie Family Style (Jon Pickow)
Jean Ritchie developed a unique dulcimer style that featured original counter melodies that complemented the vocal melody of a tune. Her technique, using either fingers or a noter on the fingerboard, was traditional, playing tunes on the melody string rather than strumming chords. This class will focus on the Ritchie Family repertoire and explore the use of countermelodies as accompaniment for songs.

Fiddle, Beginning (Meghan Bryant)
If you’re totally new to the fiddle, this is the class for you.  Meghan will guide students through the process of tuning the fiddle, how to hold the fiddle and bow, and playing a few basic tunes.

Fiddle, Intermediate/Advanced (Gabe Dansereau)
If you can play a few fiddle tunes from memory or you have previous experience playing a bowed stringed instrument, this class is for you.  Gabe will teach a few exciting tunes from the repertoire of Kentucky old time string band music.

Finding Your Story (Dana Wildsmith)
Novelist Jim Harrison has said, “Death steals everything except our stories.” In this short series of sessions, we will take a break from the happy swirl of music and crafts and friendships to delve into ways to capture these active moments in useful words that will become our stories.

Guitar, Beginning (Pierceton Hobbs)
If you’ve never played the guitar or you know a few basic chords, this is the class for you.  Pierceton will teach basic chords and strumming techniques, share some traditional songs, and demonstrate how the guitar fits into the old time string band setting.

Guitar, Intermediate (Tommy Bledsoe)
Now that you are comfortable with playing chords and staying in rhythm, you are ready to add songs, guitar runs, chordal transitions and melody breaks to your toolkit. Whether you are a finger-picker or a flat picker, you will learn new ways to enhance your repertoire of songs and tunes. If you are new to singing along as you play guitar, you will build confidence as you develop skills, step-by-step, exploring ear training, Nashville numbering system and basic guitar tablature.

Knott County Neighbors Community Activity (Nicole Musgrave and Sam Gleaves)
This activity provides a chance for Folk Gathering participants to get to know folks who live here in Knott County and experience the community beyond the Settlement School campus. Possible activities include sharing music and dance with folks at the Hickory Hill Recovery Center and the Knott County Health and Rehabilitation Center, and a tour and light work day on the Settlement School farm.

Mandolin (Rich Kirby)
We’ll start by playing tunes, simple or complicated as the class may wish. Time and interest permitting, we’ll also look at chording and playing with songs.

Quilting (Reta Smith)
Reta will demonstrate some of her handmade quilts and tell about her process of making them.  Students will learn basic sewing techniques and work on a basic quilt project such as a ninepatch quilt, a pinwheel quilt square, or a quilted table runner.

Shape Note Singing (Ron Pen)
We will engage in musical and social harmony through the recreation of a rural 19th-century singing school. Singing from the Sacred Harp tune book (1991 edition), which features intoxicating harmonizations written in a unique four-shape notation of triangles, squares, circles, and diamonds makes learning to read music easy and enjoyable. The class will also weave in background historical and social context. The class will accommodate both total beginners and veteran singers. Books will be available to borrow for class use.

Singing: Traditional Music Song Circle
Join the circle with your best instrument- your voice- and learn classic traditional songs, along with more obscure selections that will become your new favorites. The oral tradition is very much alive in this class, although some song and chord sheets will be available. Everybody will get an opportunity to share or request a song. Instruments are encouraged but not required.

Singing:  Morning Singing session with the Ritchie Nieces
This gathering following breakfast sets the tone for the day. Traditional songs led by different members of the community fill the air with harmony. Most songs are familiar favorites or are easily learned, but two oft-used songbooks are also available, the Hindman Songster and Songs of All Time. The seating in concentric circles imparts a sense of community of shared music and culture.

Wood Carving (Harvey Amburgey)
We will learn the basics skills of carving by imagining an object trapped in a piece of soft wood, and freeing it with pocketknife and chisel. We will begin by creating a spoon, and other projects may follow according to the interest of the individual participant.

Staff

Staff

Harvey Amburgey of Dead Mare Branch in Knott County, KY has been a celebrated woodcarver for over thirty years. He is well known for his lifelike fruit, animals, bowls, and unique spoons. Harvey was born into a family known for their ways with wood; Jethro Amburgey was a noted dulcimer maker who crafted over 1,300 instruments while at the Hindman Settlement School.

Tommy Bledsoe is a musician, actor, writer, director, and educator. He grew up in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, where he learned the value of passing along cultural wisdom through dance, songs, and stories. Since learning guitar in his teens, he has developed abundant musical skills on banjo, fiddle, bass, harmonica, mandolin, jarana and other string instruments. Tommy toured the U.S. and abroad from 1980-1998 as a member of Roadside Theater Company, a division of Appalshop, Inc., a multimedia arts center based in Whitesburg, KY. Tommy recorded on and produced audio and video productions for June Appal Recordings, Mountain Empire Community College Home Craft Days Festival, Tour St. Augustine, and Kentucky Educational Television programs Old Music for New Ears, Telling Tales, and Winter- Season of Darkness and Light, which he co-wrote with his wife, Joy D’Elia.  Tommy and his family moved to St. Augustine in 1998, where he held arts-related jobs, such as Operations Manager of the St. Augustine Amphitheatre, classroom music teacher and Program Specialist for the Visual and Performing Arts for the St. Johns County School District. Tommy continues to develop traditional and cultural arts programs, wherever he goes, including regular music, storytelling and dance events and gatherings. He recently retired from the St. Johns County School District and now devotes full time to enjoying life and sharing it with others.

Jason Brashear is a Hazard, Kentucky-native and fervent believer in the important role of sustainable agriculture and local food systems in promoting a just transition for central Appalachia. Jason serves as the Director of Foodways at Hindman Settlement School, overseeing the Settlement School’s farm and greenhouses, the Knott County Farmer’s Market, and other work promoting the advancement of regional food culture. Prior to coming to Hindman Settlement School, Jason served as a 4-H Youth Development Agent for the Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service in both Bell and Letcher Counties and as Eastern Kentucky Farm to Table Coordinator with Community Farm Alliance. He taught agriculture and served as the Future Farmers of America advisor for Perry County Central High School. Jason lives at Backwood Farms in Leatherwood.

Meghan Bryant is originally from Martin, Kentucky.  She has participated in the Cowan Creek Mountain Music School program for many years as a student, and she now teaches as part of the program. Meghan has been a regular performer at the Mountain Arts Center Kentucky Opry.  In 2019, she enrolled as a student at Morehead State University and she currently performs with the Mountain Music Ambassadors, one of many music ensembles directed by the Kentucky Center for Traditional Music.  Meghan teaches fiddle as part of the Pick and Bow After-School Music Program sponsored by Hindman Settlement School and South Arts.

Gabriel “Gabe” Dansereau is a jazz guitarist, composer/arranger, folk musician, and educator whom currently resides in Greensboro, North Carolina. Gabriel grew up in the rich old-time/folk music tradition of the Appalachian Mountains where he learned to play the fiddle by rote at the age of 8. Using these skills, he began studying jazz at the age of 15. As a folk musician, Gabriel has performed at many events/camps in Kentucky including the Seedtime on the Cumberland music festival, Cowan Creek Mountain Music School, and Hindman Settlement School’s Family Folk Week. He has also performed for lecture classes with a focus in Appalachian Studies at the University of Kentucky, Davidson College and Centre College. Gabriel has a bachelor’s degree in Jazz Studies from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. As a jazz musician, he has been a frequent performer at many venues. As an educator, Gabriel taught private guitar lessons through the organization Community Arts Collaborative (CAC) for 2 years. He has also taught guitar classes through CAC for after-school programs dedicated to getting kids involved in the arts. In addition to this, Gabriel has worked with several local high school and middle school ensembles.

Sophie Dansereau is originally from Clay County, Kentucky. She now lives in Boone, North Carolina where she has been working as a preschool teacher for the past 4 years. Sophie grew up attending Appalachian Family Folk Week and she still remembers many of the songs and stories told to her as a child. As an adult, these songs and stories have only strengthened her love for the Appalachian mountains and the rich history of the region.

Joy D’Elia was born into a very musical extended family that instilled in her the importance of art in one’s life. Over the years she has been a teacher, published poet, musician, actress, television writer/producer, sailor (across the ocean!), 4-H Leader, co-producer of events for St. Augustine Ballet, and Program Coordinator for the St. Johns Cultural Council. Together with her husband, Tommy Bledsoe, she performs old-time and bluegrass music in their group, Skin & Bonz. Over the years they have performed on many stages and been featured in two Kentucky Education Television series, Telling Tales, and Old Music for New Ears. Joy and Tommy also wrote and produced another KET production, Winter: Season of Darkness and Light. She currently is the chair of the Recognizing Outstanding Women in the Arts awards committee in St. Augustine, FL.

Larry Germain has been playing the bass professionally for the last 30 years. He caught the Bluegrass/Old Time/Mountain Music fever in 2010 and has been an enthusiastic supporter ever since.

Sam Gleaves is a musician, singer, songwriter, and teaching artist. Growing up in Wytheville, Virginia, Sam began learning old time music as a teenager.  Sam began performing more extensively during his four year stint with the Berea College Bluegrass Ensemble.  Since earning a degree in Folklore from Berea College, Sam has taught Appalachian music at a variety of music camps and performed at festivals and concerts throughout the U.S. and abroad.  Sam currently serves as the Traditional Arts Director at Hindman Settlement School where he spends most of his time leading music and dance activities with students in Knott County elementary schools.

Larah Helayne is a singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist from Mount Sterling, Kentucky. Growing up in the foothills of the Appalachias, Larah’s life and music have been greatly impacted by the magnificence of the mountains. Her songs reflect both the beauty and struggles of living in Eastern Kentucky, while weaving in the story of her own wild and wonderful life. Her songs possess a startling honesty and an unfaltering hope that captivates anyone who takes the time to listen.

Pierceton Hobbs was born to young parents in 1998 and “reared” in Dickenson County, Virginia, home of the Stanley Brothers. Hobbs developed a strong love for music and storytelling at an early age and soon taught himself guitar, banjo, and other instruments. He has taught for the Junior Appalachian Musicians after-school music program in Wise County, Virginia and he currently teaches for Hindman Settlement School’s Pick and Bow after-school music program.  Pierceton serves as the Production Assistant for WMMT Radio at Appalshop, where he also coordinates the Seedtime on the Cumberland festival.

Pam Hunt saw her first dulcimer on a family vacation to Berea, KY in 1975. Her interest in traditional music was sparked by acquiring an autoharp in 1975, and a dulcimer in 1977. Upon meeting Jean Ritchie in 1978 and taking her dulcimer class at Berea College Christmas Country Dance School, her dulcimer technique was cemented as she fell in love with the traditional dulcimer style of playing.  A 30 year Elementary Music Specialist in the public schools, Pam has spent summers connecting with the traditional music community. In 2019, she won 1st place in Dulcimer and 2nd Place in Autoharp at the Smithville, Tennessee Old Time Fiddlers Jamboree. She utilizes Dalcroze Eurhythmics movement in her teaching and is a member of the American Eurhythmics Society.

Rich Kirby has been soaked in mountain music for longer than he cares to mention. It began in the lap of his grandmother Addie Graham, an outstanding Kentucky traditional singer. That started a lifelong involvement with the music—learning, performing, collecting, recording and teaching. Rich is a virtuosic fiddler, banjo player, and mandolinist who has served as news director for WMMT, Appalshop’s radio station. Rich has played and recorded with a number of bands including Wry Straw and Rich and the Poor Folks, and has produced many albums for the June Appal label including a release of his grandmother’s music, “Addie Graham: Been a Long Time Travelling.” Rich is a founding member of the celebrated East Kentucky old time string band, Rich and the Po’ Folks, playing the full range of traditional mountain music– fiddle tunes, ballads, coal mining songs, Carter Family pieces, and contemporary mountain songs. The band’s repertoire comes from the members’ home territory of eastern Kentucky and southwest Virginia, hot spots for one of America’s great musical traditions. They recorded the album “When the Whistle Blew” on the June Appal label in 2010. Rich lives in Dungannon, Virginia, across the hill from the homeplace of Fiddlin’ Cowan Powers.

Nicole Musgrave was raised in central Ohio and graduated from The Ohio State University with degrees in Folklore and International Business. After college, she moved to the southern Ohio hills of Chillicothe, where she became immersed in a community of Appalachian musicians and artists, and spent several years developing her own creative practices around music and textile arts.  In 2018, Nicole graduated from Western Kentucky University with her Master of Arts in Folk Studies, with an emphasis on public folklore, foodways & health, newcomer communities, Appalachian culture, and multimedia documentation & production.  Nicole serves as the Folklife Specialist at Hindman Settlement School, coordinating traditional arts education programs and providing administrative support for the Makery, the Settlement School’s immersive online writing program.  Nicole records oral history interviews with artists in the eastern Kentucky region and produces a program titled Now and Then which is broadcast weekly on Appalshop’s WMMT radio station.

Cari Norris grew up spending many, many weekends and long bedtime hours in the arms of her grandmother Lily May Ledford, who had a long career in early radio as a member of the Coon Creek Girls. Hearing the sounds of her grandmother’s plaintive ballads and sweet lullabies made a lifelong impression on her and the way she experiences music. Cari began performing and teaching traditional music while in college. She has taught and performed widely in the eastern United States and plays dulcimer, banjo, and guitar. Cari has made five recordings and sings in a plaintive, reflective mountain style.

Ron Pen is a performer and scholar of the music of the Appalachian region. A founding member of the Appalachian Association of Sacred Harp Singers, with whom he performed on A Prairie Home Companion, Ron is now Professor and Director Emeritus of the John Jacob Niles Center for American Music at the University of Kentucky. He is the author of I Wonder As I Wander, a biography of folk icon John Jacob Niles. Ron began fiddling forty-five years ago in Rockbridge County, VA and has since participated in various workshops and festivals across the region including Hindman Settlement School’s Folk Week, Augusta’s Old-Time and Singing weeks, Berea’s Christmas Country Dance School, and many times at Swannanoa Gathering. He has also performed music across the globe with the Red State Ramblers and recently shared shape note singing with Sufi chant in Lancashire, England.

Jon Pickow began his singing career at a very early age, appearing with his mother, Appalachian folksinger Jean Ritchie at concerts and folk festivals throughout the country, including The Newport Folk Festival, The Philadelphia Folk Festival, Fox Hollow and The Mariposa Festival in Canada. He performed with Jean over the years until her retirement in 2009 and has produced, and performed on many of her albums. Jon has appeared recently at the Great American Dulcimer Festival at Pine Mountain State Resort in Pineville, Kentucky, and at Kentucky Music Weekend at the Iroquois Amphitheater in Louisville, Kentucky, which is considered one of the premiere folk festivals of the region. He has taught banjo and harmony at Kentucky Music Week in Bardstown, KY, as well as a seminar on Songs of the Ritchie Family. Jon has also enjoyed teaching and performing at The Swannanoa Gathering at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina as well as Christmas Country Dance School at Berea College in Kentucky.

The Ritchie Nieces, Judy Hudson, Joy Powers, Patty Tarter and Susie Ritchie, are members of the celebrated Singing Family of the Cumberlands. They enjoy singing and sharing traditional family songs, songs written by their aunt, Jean Ritchie, and most any other song they know! They have performed individually and as a group frequently, at various concerts at Berea College, Hindman Settlement School’s Appalachian Family Folk Week, Christmas Country Dance School, and at the Appalachia in the Bluegrass series at the Niles Center for American Music at the University of Kentucky. Their harmony is simply ethereal.

Reta Smith is a lifelong resident of Knott County, Kentucky.  Reta took an interest in quilting with her mother-in-law and they tacked many quilts together. Reta has been quilting on her own and teaching herself new quilting techniques for over ten years.  Pinwheel, bow tie, and square patterns are among Reta’s favorite patterns to quilt, and she also decorates some quilt patterns with chicken-scratch embroidery.  Reta is part of the quilting group that meets regularly at the Talcum Mennonite Church.

Frances Whitaker, living high on a ridge above Blackey, KY is a master basket maker who has exhibited widely throughout the Appalachian Region. As she moved about with her husband, Stewart, in his career, she worked with the Extension Service in seven counties in southeastern Kentucky. She was a nutrition assistant with Extension’s Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Program in Harlan County when the program was piloted there in 1969. In 1993, Whitaker learned to make baskets at an Extension-sponsored workshop and has become a master basket maker and teacher, having taught basket workshops in at least eight counties, including frequently at Hindman Settlement School’s Appalachian Family Folk Week.

Dana Wildsmith’s new collection of poems is One Light, Texas Review Press, Fall. She is the author of a novel, Jumping, Her environmental memoir, Back to Abnormal: Surviving with an Old Farm in the New South, was Finalist for Georgia Author of the Year. She is the author of five collections of poetry Wildsmith has served as Artist-in-Residence for Grand Canyon National Park and Everglades National Park, as Writer-in-Residence for the Island Institute in Sitka, Alaska, and she is a Fellow of the Hanbidge Center for Creative Arts and Sciences. Wildsmith teaches English Literacy through Lanier Technical College.

Randy Wilson has 35 years experience with folk arts in eastern Kentucky- fiddle tunes, songs, banjo styles, folk stories, dance calling, and children’s games. Of special interest is his work on a variety of period banjos from Africa to Appalachia. Representing Appalachia in a multitude of festivals, Mr. Wilson has played at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival on the National Mall, the University of Rome, Italy and cultural exchanges in San Antonio, TX, Anchorage, AK, and the Bronx, NY.​ Retired from service at Hindman Settlement School, the man is cut loose upon the world to do his own variety of original blues and children’s songs.

About Campus

About Campus

In order to maximize their experience at the Workshop, it is recommended that participants stay in campus housing.

The campus is hilly, and there will be some walking during the week. So, bring comfortable shoes. Please detail any mobility issues or concerns during the registration process and we will make every effort to accommodate your needs.

Rooms are simple but comfortable. Bed linens and pillows are provided, but you will need to bring your own towels, wash cloths, and toiletries. Our facilities utilize shared bathrooms. Consequently, you may wish to bring a robe. There are no telephones or TVs. A small, shared refrigerator is available.

Wireless Internet is available in the Mullins Center, May Stone Gathering Place, and Stucky buildings. The Knott County Public Library, located adjacent to campus, has public computers available with Internet access.

Depending on you service provider, cell phone coverage is spotty to good. You can leave the main office number (606-785-5475) as an emergency contact number. It is staffed during business hours. After hours, in the event of an emergency, a staff member may be reached at 606-438-5455.

All buildings are air-conditioned and smoke-free.

Pets, firearms, and alcohol are prohibited on School property.

Dress is casual, but shirt and shoes are required.

Our dining hall offers traditional and vegetarian meal options. Please indicate your dietary preference during the registration process. We have a filtered water system at the Dining Hall and public water is supplied from the Carr Fork Reservoir. The tap water is drinkable, but some prefer to bring their own drinking water. Bottled water is also available for purchase on campus.

A Dollar General, a Rite-Aid, and an IGA grocery store are located a few miles down the road. A small convenience store is located within walking distance of campus. A Wal-Mart and other major stores are located in Hazard, which is about 20 minutes away.

Register for Appalachian Family Folk Gathering! June 8 - 11, 2020